Tom Wicker (Timeout)

This slickly produced revival...

What a bunch of Muppets! The most loveable felt creations this side of Kermit and Miss Piggy are back, starting off at Greenwich Theatre as part of a national tour by Sell a Door Theatre Company.

If you saw the West End production of ‘Avenue Q’ before it closed, there are few surprises here – both shows look and feel incredibly similar – but that’s not faint praise. This slickly produced revival has the same wit and energy that made the original such a hit.

This is the heightened, happy harmony of ‘Sesame Street’ lovingly subverted and transposed to a cash-strapped New York suburb. From ‘Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist’ to ‘There’s a Fine, Fine Line’, Robert Lopez’s songs are still outrageously funny, and big-hearted.

The superb cast seamlessly blend their performances with the puppets they’re operating or acting opposite. Tom Steedon impresses as naïve English grad Princeton and closeted gay Republican, Rod. And a hilarious Lucie-Mae Sumner basically steals the show as Kate Monster and Lucy the Slut.

The show’s pitch-perfect, primary-coloured evocation of trying to get by in a world that never seems to give you a break is as funny, weirdly touching and relevant now as it ever was. Director Cressida Carré ensures the pace never slackens, but there’s plenty of humanity in these puppets

Tom Wicker (Timeout)

This slickly produced revival...

What a bunch of Muppets! The most loveable felt creations this side of Kermit and Miss Piggy are back, starting off at Greenwich Theatre as part of a national tour by Sell a Door Theatre Company.

If you saw the West End production of ‘Avenue Q’ before it closed, there are few surprises here – both shows look and feel incredibly similar – but that’s not faint praise. This slickly produced revival has the same wit and energy that made the original such a hit.

This is the heightened, happy harmony of ‘Sesame Street’ lovingly subverted and transposed to a cash-strapped New York suburb. From ‘Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist’ to ‘There’s a Fine, Fine Line’, Robert Lopez’s songs are still outrageously funny, and big-hearted.

The superb cast seamlessly blend their performances with the puppets they’re operating or acting opposite. Tom Steedon impresses as naïve English grad Princeton and closeted gay Republican, Rod. And a hilarious Lucie-Mae Sumner basically steals the show as Kate Monster and Lucy the Slut.

The show’s pitch-perfect, primary-coloured evocation of trying to get by in a world that never seems to give you a break is as funny, weirdly touching and relevant now as it ever was. Director Cressida Carré ensures the pace never slackens, but there’s plenty of humanity in these puppets